Eddy Lover, the other face of reggaeton


Eddy Lover, the other face of reggaeton

In his album Perdóname, the young Panamanian shows an alternative full of fusion, feeling and romance.

Eddy Lover
Foto: Machete Music
Eddy Lover swears that he wants to imprint more romance into reggaeton. The performer talked to us about his first album, his songs, his name and his musical favorites.

At the ripe age of 22, in the first single of his album Perdóname, this Panamanian sings to the moon and swears that no matter how strong the competition may be, he will win thousands of hearts.

How do you plan to win the public, Eddy Lover?
With this disc titled Perdóname, my first album. The title comes from a song I did with the band La Factoría and the theme we're using to promote the album is "Luna" (Moon). I know people will love it because it's different from what they're used to hearing.

Tell us a little about "Luna".
The song is about a person's feelings when he loses his loved one. At that moment he falls into sadness, depression, and even despair. Then he asks the moon for help, to mediate for him and to help him cope with the situation by talking to the person he loves to explain to her that he can't go on living like this.

It seems that despite being urban material with a reggaeton beat, it carries a lot of romance, right?
Yeah. We're used to listening to romantic music. The truth is that I'm very romantic and my feelings always tend to come out. This is why what I'm offering is full of lyrics that carry feelings, emotions. There's a theme titled "No debiste volver" (You shouldn't have come back), that comes from a true story and touches me deeply.

What happened?
"No debiste volver" is about a romance I had with a girl I loved with all my heart. After a while she lost interest in the relationship and as time passed she went away. I managed to get over it and, when I was finally all right, she decided to come back and, well, it was too late, things had changed. It only showed that she had never really loved me, so I made it into a song to express that.

Where do you get your inspiration to write your songs?
Let me tell you something. Every time I think about a song, what I do is look around at what's happening to mankind. You know what I mean? I look at the things people relate to, and that's where the lyrics come from. The melody is also important and what I do is create sad tunes. I want people to feel that way about my music, that it would affect them deeply, to the point of moving them to tears.

It's interesting that a reggaeton singer would gravitate toward such themes
I've often analyzed myself to find an explanation for this and so far I haven't come up with an answer. It's not that I'm a sad person. On the contrary, I'm a very happy guy and always in a good mood. Maybe it's because since I was a child, though I listened to all kinds of music, I was more inclined to the stories of Arjona, Franco de Vita, Ana Gabriel, and at age 12, when I started writing my first lyrics, those would be the songs.

In a market with so many new artists and options, does it scare you to know that the competition is so tough?
That's what makes this career so interesting, the competition. When there are so many people into something, it helps the quality of the product. The thing is to win the public and, when somebody comes up with something new, I have to try and find something better. It scares me a little bit, but it also makes me sharp and alert, and makes me push harder in my work.

Where did the name Eddy Lover come from?
When I was a kid, in the neighborhood where I grew up in Panama, I was always singing romantic songs, and whenever I got together with other kids, my friends would say, "Hey, here comes The Lover to sing." And that's what they called me. Eddy comes from my real name, Eduardo.

Tell the public why they should listen to your music.
Well, many people in the world have a negative view of the genre. They think that all it does is to demean women or express negative things. What I want to do is make a contribution of my own to help change that view. I want people to listen to different lyrics that make more sense and carry more feelings, and that they can relate to. That's why you have to buy the album, which is already on sale in all the stores and you can listen to a sample here on PeopleEnEspanol.com.

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