Charlie Carver, uno de los gemelos de <i>Desperate Housewives</i>, reveló que es gay


Charlie Carver, uno de los gemelos de Desperate Housewives, reveló que es gay

Charlie Carver

Foto: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

El actorCharlie Carver, quien interpreteba uno de los gemelos de Desperate Housewives , reveló que es gay a través de una serie de ensayos que divulgó en su cuenta de Instagram.

“Cuando era niño, sabía que quería ser actor. También sabía que era diferente a otros chicos de mi grado. Después de un tiempo, ese conocimiento abstracto creció y se articuló a través de un doloroso proceso marcado por sentimientos de desesperación y alienación, que culminó al decir dos palabras en voz alta: 'Soy gay'", compartió el pasado lunes el actor, quien también formó parte del elenco de la serie Teen Wolf de MTV.

FOTOS: Los 10 padres gay más cool del espectáculo

Pt 1: “Be who you needed when you were younger”. About a year ago, I saw this photo while casually scrolling through my Instagram one morning. I’m not one for inspirational quotes, particularly ones attributed to “Mx Anonymous”- something mean in me rebukes the pithiness of proverbs, choosing to judge them as trite instead of possibly-generally-wise, resonant, or helpful. And in the case of the good ol’ Anonymous kind, I felt that there was something to be said for the missing context. Who wrote or said the damn words? Why? And to/for who in particular? Nonetheless, I screen-capped the picture and saved it. It struck me for some reason, finding itself likeable enough to join the ranks of the “favorites” album on my phone. I’d see it there almost daily, a small version of it next to my other “favorites”; I’d see it every time I checked into the gym, pulled up a picture of my insurance cards, my driver’s license.... Important Documents. And over the course of about-a-year, it became clear why the inspirational photo had called out to me. As a young boy, I knew I wanted to be an actor. I knew I wanted to be a lot of things! I thought I wanted to be a painter, a soccer player, a stegosaurus... But the acting thing stuck. It was around that age that I also knew, however abstractly, that I was different from some of the other boys in my grade. Over time, this abstract “knowing” grew and articulated itself through a painful gestation marked by feelings of despair and alienation, ending in a climax of saying three words out loud: “I am gay”. I said them to myself at first, to see how they felt. They rang true, and I hated myself for them. I was twelve. It would take me a few years before I could repeat them to anyone else, in the meantime turning the phrase over and over in my mouth until I felt comfortable and sure enough to let the words pour out again, this time to my family...

A photo posted by Charlie Carver (@charliecarver) on


En otro mensaje, el joven de 27 años explicó que le aterraba la idea de salir del clóset tras pensar que tendría menos oportunidades para conseguir papeles.


“Como actor, creía que mi responsabilidad con el arte y la industria era permanecer neutral. Ser un lienzo, un camaleón, el siguiente personaje”, escribió. “Tenía miedo de que salir del armario me limitara a un tipo de papeles, a una percepción limitada con la que no estaba conforme profesionalmente”.

Pt 3: After the first episode of television I shot went to air, it became clear to me that I was at least no longer anonymous. For the first time, I found myself stopped on the street, asked to take a picture by a complete stranger – part of the job I had willingly signed up for. Fame, to whatever degree, is a tricky creature. In this day and age, particularly with the access offered by social media, it demands that you be On, that you be Yourself, Always, in your work and to your fans. In this way, the distinction between public and private has become blurry, begging questions like “to what extent do I share myself? Do what extent do I have to?” When it came to this differentiation of public/private, I was of the opinion that my sexuality could stay off the table. While my Coming Out was very important for me, I wanted to believe in a world where one’s sexuality was for the most part irrelevant. That it didn’t “matter,” or that at least it was something that didn’t need to or ideally shouldn’t ever have to be announced to a stranger, a new colleague, an interviewer. Even the words “Coming Out” bothered me. I took issue with them insofar as that “Coming Out” implied being greeted with attention, attention for something I would prefer to be implicitly just Human, an attribute or adjective that was only part of how I saw my whole self. I did not want to be defined by my sexuality. Sure, I am a proud gay man, but I don’t identify as a Gay man, or a GAY man, or just gay. I identify as a lot of things, these various identifications and identities taking up equal space and making up an ever-fluid sense of Self. Furthermore, as an actor, I believed that my responsibility to the craft and the business was to remain benevolently neutral – I was a canvas, a chameleon, the next character. For the most part I had a duty to stay a Possibility in the eye of casting, directors, and the public. If I Came Out, I feared I would be limiting myself to a type, to a perception with limits that I was not professionally comfortable with. And I created in my imagination an Industry that was just as rigid in this belief as well.

A photo posted by Charlie Carver (@charliecarver) on


Su hermano gemelo, el también actor Max Carver, aplaudió su coraje.

“Mi hermano tiene huevos”, tuiteó

no votos

que opinas